Month: July 2016

Afternoon Book Club to discuss Murder on the Orient Express

Join us on Wednesday, August 10th at 1:30 as we discuss, Murder on the Orient Express…..

From http://agathachristie.wikia.com/wiki/Murder_on_the_Orient_Express

Hercule Poirot is traveling when he is suddenly called back to London. He travels back with a friend, a director of the the Wagon Lit. Company, to Calais. During the first night of the trip the train is forced to stop due to a snow drift that has partially obstructed the tracks. The next morning the body of one of the passengers is found, the victim having suffered multiple stab wounds. At the request of the company’s director Poirot launches an investigation into the man’s death, and quickly discovers that there is no shortage of suspects among the travelers.

Returning from an important case in Palestine, Hercule Poirot boards the Orient Express in Istanbul. The train is unusually crowded for the time of year. Poirot secures a berth only with the help of his friend M. Bouc, a director of theCompagnie Internationale des Wagons-Lits. When a Mr. Harris fails to show up, Poirot takes his place. On the second night, Poirot gets a compartment to himself.

That night, near Belgrade, at about twenty-three minutes before 1:00 am, Poirot wakes to the sound of a loud noise. It seems to come from the compartment next to his, which is occupied by Mr. Ratchett. When Poirot peeks out his door, he sees the conductor knock on Mr. Ratchett’s door and ask if he is all right. A man replies in French “Ce n’est rien. Je me suis trompé“, which means “It’s nothing. I made a mistake”, and the conductor moves on to answer a bell down the passage. Poirot decides to go back to bed, but he is disturbed by the fact that the train is unusually still and his mouth is dry.

As he lies awake, he hears a Mrs. Hubbard ringing the bell urgently. When Poirot then rings the conductor for a bottle of mineral water, he learns that Mrs. Hubbard claimed that someone had been in her compartment. He also learns that the train has stopped due to a snowstorm. Poirot dismisses the conductor and tries to go back to sleep, only to be wakened again by a thump on his door. This time when Poirot gets up and looks out of his compartment, the passage is completely silent, and he sees nothing except the back of a woman in a scarlet kimono retreating down the passage in the distance.

The next day he awakens to find that Ratchett is dead, having been stabbed twelve times in his sleep, M. Bouc suggesting that Poirot take the case because it is so obviously his kind of case; nothing more is required than for him to sit, think, and take in the available evidence.

One Book, One Community voting to begin August 1st

One Book One Community organizers are once again asking the public to vote for next year’s One Book, One Community book selection!  The public vote initiative is a way to promote community involvement in the selection of the title, rather than handing over a single title each year.  This year there will be five titles on the ballot. The 2017 OBOC regional campaign represents collaboration between 80 libraries in six counties: Berks, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, Perry and York.

How the voting works…

From a ballot with five book titles that made the final grade by the Book Selection committee, the public is asked to pick one of the five books that they would be interested in reading and discussing in 2017. To vote the public will go to www.oboc.org to access an online ballot.  For those who wish to fill out a paper ballot, they must go to participating libraries to cast their vote.  The public may also submit their vote at Isaac’s Restaurant locations in the region. Readers who vote at Isaac’s will also be entered for a chance to win $100 Isaac’s gift card. Berks, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, Perry and York counties will participate in the 2017 campaign.

One Book, Your Vote for the OBOC 2017 title will take place August 1 – 31, 2016. The winner will be announced to the public in December, 2016.  With the public vote for the 2017 title, reading of the OBOC title will take place in January, and programs at the public libraries will begin in February, which is designated as both Library Lovers’ Month and Book Lovers’ Month. Multiple copies of the winning title will be available at your local public library beginning in January 2017.

Meet the Candidates

These are the titles on the One Book, Your Vote 2017 ballot,
Click on the titles to see if they are available:

    One_Book_Your_Vote_Logo_2016 (5) Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks

Imagine you are a lonely kid with social and neurological problems that mean you have no real friends at school. Imagine you’re an only child whose parents can’t seem to agree on what’s best for you. Who would you turn to? Budo, your imaginary friend, of course! Budo is unusual because he’s lasted longer than most imaginary friends, helping his friend Max navigate this scary world. He’s decided to write his story for us to read, but before you start thinking this sounds like some sort of sweet tale about a lonely kid, think again. Not only is this book about friendship and love and loss and growing up, but it is also a page-turning thriller with a hero worthy of the best detective novels, who races to find out what’s happened to his friend, so he can save him. You’ll think about Max and Budo long after you’ve turned to the last page.

 

One_Book_Your_Vote_Logo_2016 (4)Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard

President, James A. Garfield, had only been in office for four months when a disgruntled office seeker met Garfield in the Washington, D.C. train station and shot him. Garfield lingered for many months while the nation held its breath. This book chronicles the physician’s archaic medical practices and prejudices against women and African-American doctors. Even Alexander Graham Bell gets in the act with a special machine to locate the bullet within the President’s body. Garfield’s rise to the Presidency is as dramatic as the shortness of it, as the writer tells us of the factions swirling around the seat of power in this time of corruption, office seekers, and at the edge of the 20th century.

 

 

One_Book_Your_Vote_Logo_2016 (6)Midnight in Siberia by David Greene

What is daily life like for ordinary people living in Putin’s Russia? Pennsylvania native and NPR correspondent David Greene introduces us to folks living in villages and cities along the Trans-Siberian railway. We enter their homes, eat and drink with them, and hear their heartfelt thoughts about Putin, democracy, America and much more. We laugh and cry with them as we travel on the iconic train between Moscow and Vladivostok.

 

 

 

One_Book_Your_Vote_Logo_2016 (3)A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

Ove is everyone’s idea of a neighbor from hell. He has definite opinions of how the world should run, staunch principles, a strict routine, and a very short fuse.  When new neighbors move in next door and flatten Ove’s mailbox, a lively chain of events occurs that is not limited to unkempt cats, unexpected friendships, arrogant bureaucrats, several trips to the hospital, and the backing up of a U-Haul trailer. Along the way Ove and his neighbors learn about each other as well as the meaning of love, friendship, and community, oh and computers.

 

 

 

One_Book_Your_Vote_Logo_2016 (2)Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein

Rose Under Fire is a must read novel regardless of your genre preference!  Rose Justice is an eighteen-year-old pilot who hails from Central Pennsylvania.  She volunteers to serve in the Air Transport Auxiliary during World War II.  In a brave attempt to ram a “flying bomb” mid-air, her plane crosses into enemy territory.  Rose is captured and sent to Ravensbrück, a concentration camp.  She meets women with deeply tragic yet heroic stories struggling to survive at the camp.  They band together and protect one another from their German captors.  Elizabeth Wein does not shy away from the atrocities committed during the war as she tells an endearing story of friendship, loyalty and self-sacrifice.

 

 

 

It is not necessary to read or have read these titles to place your vote!

One Book Vote Logo
Logo for One Book

Child and Youth Programs for August

Tuesday, August 2

2 – 3pm: On your mark, get set, read…the rocks!

Every rock has a story to tell. Rocks form from molten lava, from accumulations of sand, clay, and shells, from squeezing deep within the Earth, from waves washing a sandy beach… Children with Naturalist Mary Ann Schlegel will discover features of different types of rocks and “read” some rocks on their own to decipher unique rock stories. For ages 6 to 16 years old. Registration required, limited to 35 participants. Please contact Randi Kennedy, Youth Services Coordinator at 717-806-1804 or rkennedy@quarryvillelibrary.org to register.

(Ages 8 and up.)

 

Wednesday, August 3

2 pm: Intro to Junkyard Drumming

WorHeads Up logoking with Heads Up Artist Mentors, students will learn about the basics of rhythm using everyday objects to create a cohesive whole. This program focuses on
active learning and participation. It will get loud, but will showcase how with teamwork and cooperation, we can create something exciting. Registration required, limit of 30 participants. Please contact Randi Kennedy, Youth Services Coordinator at 717-806-1804 or rkennedy@quarryvillelibrary.org to register.

(Ages 8+)

 

Thursday, August 4

 1parachute play0 am: Parachute Play

Thirty minutes of fun with a parachute plus silly songs and rhymes will be just what your child needs to get the wiggles out!  Bubbles, balls, and other props will ensure that the fun never stops!

(Ages 1 – 3 years with a caregiver)

 

10:45 am: Parachute Games

It’s parachute fun for the preschool crowd! Songs, rhymes, and games to keep your preschooler moving, laughing, and having fun!

(Ages 3-6 years with a caregiver)

4 – 5 pm: Thursday Crafternoon

Stop by library Thursday afternoons & see what we’re crafting from recycled things!

(Age 5+)

6:30 pm: Family Movie Night

Join us for a FREE movie and popcorn in a family friendly atmosphere! All ages welcome – Movies Rated G or PG. Please call for this month’s title! Popcorn provided by the library!

(All ages welcome)

 

Friday, August 5

5 pm: Teen Leadership Group

A new volunteer initiative for teens! Do you want to make a difference at your library? Consider joining the new Teen Leadership Group at the Quarryville Library! This is a group of teens who volunteer to plan, promote, and run teen programming in the library. Come to the meeting and find out what it’s all about! Second Friday of the month.

(For ages 13 – 18.)

5:30 – 7:30 pm: Teen Night @the Library – Summer Art Showcase Reception

After-hours Teepaint brushesn Night at the Quarryville Library, featuring programs and events planned by the Teen Leadership Group. Second Friday of the month. This month’s program is a reception and announcement of the winners of the Summer Art Showcase. There are three categories:
child, teen, and adult; first and second place winners and an honorable mention will be announced for each category.

(For ages 13 – 18 and the community)

 

Wednesday, August 10

2 – 3 pm: Backbone Bonanza

Imagine a world without backbones and you’ll need to picture a lot of creatures that appear more like a bowl of jelly than a structured functional animal. Find out why a healthy vertebrate provides a strong, flexible construction for supporting the majority of creatures on earth.

(Ages 4-12)

 

Thursday, August 11

 4 – 5 pm: Thursday Crafternoon

Stop by library Thursday afternoons & see what we’re crafting from recycled things!

(Age 5+)

6 – 8 pm: All-Ages Chess Club

A chess club, for enthusiasts of all ages and abilities! Gather together to play, teach, and discuss strategy. Please bring your chess set. Second and fourth Thursday of the month.

(For all ages.)

two lego blocks6:30 – 7:30 pm: Lego Block Party

On a special night this month! We’re building creations out of Lego® Bricks. Each month we will choose a different theme to build about.  Participants should NOT bring their own Legos®, only Library Legos® will be used, because creations will be displayed in the children’s area of the library all month long, for all to see!  So join us for some creative building fun!

(All ages welcome)

 

Friday, August 12

5:30 – 7:30 pm: Teen Anime Club

Do you love anime? Check out this new club! Watch anime, have some snacks, and socialize. Content will be PG/PG13. Third Friday of the month.

(For ages 13 – 18.)

 

Saturday, August 13

Official end of the Summer Reading Program. Logs must be turned in on or before August 13th in order to receive the prizes.

 

Wednesday, August 17

 10 am: Preschool Power!

Story time for preschoolers, featuring songs, stories, and a craft.

(Ages 3.5-5 years)

 

Friday, August 19

10:30 am: Wee Readers

Join us for our Family Story Times, which include a mix of stories, crafts, songs and fun!  You never know what we’ll be doing next!  For children and their caregivers.

(Ages 1-5 years with a caregiver.)

 

Saturday, August 20

10:30 – 11:30 am: Prize Pick-Up, Tooth-Brushing Program

If your child took part in the CHI St. Joseph Tooth-Brushing program as part of this summer’s Summer Reading Program, stop by the library today to pick-up your child’s prize!

 

Wednesday, August 24

 10 am: Preschool Power!

Story time for preschoolers, featuring songs, stories, and a craft.

(Ages 3.5-5 years)

 

Thursday, August 25

 10 am: Parachute Play

Thirty minutes of fun with a parachute plus silly songs and rhymes will be just what your child needs to get the wiggles out!  Bubbles, balls, and other props will ensure that the fun never stops!

(Ages 1 – 3 years with a caregiver)

 10:45 am: Parachute Games

It’s parachute fun for the preschool crowd! Songs, rhymes, and games to keep your preschooler moving, laughing, and having fun!

(Ages 3-6 years with a caregiver)

 6 pm: All-Ages Chess Club

A chess club, for enthusiasts of all ages and abilities! Gather together to play, teach, and discuss strategy. Please bring your chess set. Second and fourth Thursday of the month.

(For all ages.)

 

Friday, August 26

10:30 am: Wee Readers

Join us for our Family Story Times, which include a mix of stories, crafts, songs and fun!  You never know what we’ll be doing next!  For children and their caregivers.

(Ages 1-5 years with a caregiver.)

Library strategic planning underway

The library board has started its work on the 2017-2020 strategic plan.  We need the public’s input to make the plan and the future of the library a success.  Library surveys will be available for patrons to fill out in the library from July 12th – July 26th.  A public forum to discuss the strategic planning priorities will be held on August 16th from 6:30 – 7:30.  All suggestions are welcome and appreciated.  If you cannot make it to the public forum, but would like to add your voice to the discussion, please call Cheri Crow at 717-806-1801.