Category: Family Museum Pass Partner

Book Signing Featuring Amish Authors Coming to Bart Township Firehall

Event flier: "Hear and Meet Authors Sam & Elsie!" Free admission to all three events. Description, "Sam S. Stoltzfus (Gordonville, PA) and Elsie Kline (Holmes County, Ohio) will be speaking, answering questions, reading, and signing their new books at the following three events." Event 1: "7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 17, at the Martindale Mennonite Fellowship Center, 352 Martindale Road, Ephrata, Pa." Event 2: "7 p.m. on Thursday, October 18, at the Bart Township Firehouse, 11 Furnace Road, Quarryville, Pa." Event 3: "7 p.m. on Friday, October 19, at the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 2215 Millstream Road, Lancaster, Pa." Sam S. Stoltfus is an Amish farmer, grandfather, historian and storyteller. In What It’s Like to Be Amish, he brings together his best stories and memories through the years, an insider’s perspective, respectful, insightful, and humorous. Elsie Kline (Fredericksburg, Ohio) is well known as the Garden and Food Editor of Farming Magazine. Her new Farm Home Cookbook is packed with delicious recipes! She and her husband David, a well-known Amish leader and author, are pioneers in sustaining the small farm. These books will be available for purchase at a 10% DISCOUNT atthese events. These two books are also available wherever books are sold. Host by Walnut Street Books in collaboration with the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society.Book Signings Feature Amish Authors

  • Hear from Sam S. Stoltzfus, author of “What It’s Like to be Amish,” and Elsie Kline, author of the “Farm Home Cookbook” during one of three book signings:
    • 7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 17, at the Martindale Mennonite Fellowship Center, 352 Martindale Road, Ephrata, Pa.;
    • 7 p.m. on Thursday, October 18, at the Bart Township Firehouse, 11 Furnace Road, Quarryville, Pa.; or
    • 7 p.m. on Friday, October 19, at the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 2215 Millstream Road, Lancaster, Pa.

Lancaster, Pa., September 17, 2018—Learn about Amish life and more when Elsie Kline and Sam S. Stoltzfus, both members of the Old Order Amish, share from their recent books. Kline is the author of “The Farm Home Cookbook” emphasizing the use of whole foods and illuminated by her ruminations on gardening, farming, family, and life. Stoltzfus has recently published “What It’s Like to Be Amish,” a memoir reflecting on life and the realities of maintaining the Amish faith.

There will be three opportunities to hear Stoltzfus and Kline speak at locations across Lancaster County. The first is on Wednesday, October 17, at 7 p.m. at the Martindale Mennonite Fellowship Center near Hinkletown, 352 Martindale Road, Ephrata, Pennsylvania. The next day, they will speak at 7 p.m. at the Bart Township Firehall in Georgetown, 11 Furnace Road, Quarryville, Pennsylvania. The final opportunity to hear from Kline and Stoltzfus will be on Friday, October 19, 7 p.m. at Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 2215 Millstream Road, Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Sam S. Stoltzfus is well-known as an Amish historian and storyteller. Now retired from farming, he is active in the Pequea Bruderschaft Library and the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. With his wife Katie, he lives outside Gordonville, Pennsylvania. They are the parents of nine, with fifty-one grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Elsie Kline is well-known as the Garden and Food Editor of “Farming Magazine.” She is an Amish mother and grandmother who loves cooking, gardening, and beekeeping. Elsie and her husband David live on the organic farm where they reared their 5 children. They have been pioneers in sustainable small-scale farming.

This book signing is hosted by Walnut Street Books in collaboration with the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society.

Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society
2215 Millstream Rd., Lancaster PA 17602
(717) 393-9745 • www.lmhs.org

Discover Lancaster’s Hidden African American Heritage at James Street Mennonite Church

Poster for event "Beyond the Underground Railroad Reclaiming African American Heritage Sites." Event information: "Monday, October 15, 6:30 pm James Street Mennonite Church 323 W James St, Lancaster, PA." Event Description: "Dr. Leroy Hopkins will share stories about a core part of Lancaster history covering African Americans’ role and involvement in Lancaster from the beginning of the city and county in the early 1700s through challenges faced in the twentieth century as well as the fight for civil rights." Sponsorship by the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 2215 Millstream Rd, Lancaster, PA 17602 • (717) 393-9745 • lmhs.org • lmhs@lmhs.org. 2215 Millstream Rd, Lancaster, Made possible with support fProAm 17: 6G0a2r d• (e7n1 7S)p 3o9t3 V-9il7la4g5e •, lwmwhsw.o.grga r• dlmenhssp@olmtvhilsl.aogreg. org; Herr Foods, Inc, www.herrs.com; Landis Homes, www.landishomes.org.Lancaster’s Hidden African American History

  • Dr. Leroy Hopkins will share stories covering African Americans’ role and involvement in Lancaster from the beginning of the city and county in the early 1700s through challenges faced in the twentieth century as well as the fight for civil rights.
  • Photos: Dr. Leroy Hopkins; Members of the Negro Civic League of Lancaster (1917-pages 1923) assembled at the grave of Thaddeus Stevens, Shreiner’s Cemetery, Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Lancaster, Pa., September 13, 2018—The story of African Americans in Lancaster is hidden throughout the county. Join the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, October 15, at James Street Mennonite Church to learn more.

Dr. Leroy Hopkins will share stories about a core part of Lancaster history covering African Americans’ role and involvement in Lancaster from the beginning of the city and county in the early 1700s through challenges faced in the twentieth century as well as the fight for civil rights.

Hopkins, a Lancaster native, earned a B.A. in German and Russian from Millersville College (1966) and a Ph.D. in Germanic Languages and Literatures at Harvard (1974). Hopkins is a Professor Emeritus of German from Millersville University where he taught from 1979-2015. He has written and published articles on local African American history. Currently, Hopkins serves on the board of LancasterHistory.org and the Crispus Attucks Community Center. He is also president of the African American Historical Society of South Central Pennsylvania.

This event is open to the public; a free-will offering will be collected. This lecture is part of over forty Lancaster Roots 2018 events. Lancaster Roots combines the events of the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society and the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum. Through public presentations, food, music, field trips, and classes, these events reveal Lancaster and its people: their stories, culture, and history.

Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society
2215 Millstream Rd., Lancaster Pa. 17602
(717) 393-9745 • www.lmhs.org

Lancaster Roots 2018
www.LancasterRoots.org

Maize and Snitz Festival at the Hans Herr House

Maize and Snitz Festival showcases early American lifeNative American props for workshop.

  • Celebrate Native American and colonial life at the Lancaster Longhouse and the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum during Maize and Snitz Festival.
  • Maize & Snitz Festival takes place at the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum on Saturday, October 7 from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

Lancaster, Pa., September 14, 2018—Maize and Snitz Festival is a celebration of early American life—both Native American and later European immigrants. Learn about their lives and cultures on Saturday, October 6, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum, 1849 Hans Herr Drive, Willow Street, Pa.

This year the Lancaster Longhouse at the Herr House & Museums helps celebrate Indigenous People’s Week. Craftspeople from the Native community will be present to show and talk about their culture, history, and crafts, as well as give guests tours of the Longhouse, a replica of the kind of dwelling used by Native Americans in Lancaster County up to the time of European settlement.

For those with an engineering inclination, there will be a variety of farm equipment running, including multiple “hit and miss” engines. The Frick steam engine and thresher, along with a bailer, will be on hand demonstrating post-harvest grain processing.

There will also be a wide variety of other demonstrations. Food-related exhibitions will include apple cider making, native food cooking, and butchering. Native crafts, such as corn husk doll making and pine needle basket making will be shown. Other European based demonstrations will also take place, such as hearth cooking, fraktur lettering, and blacksmithing.

David Schrock, director of the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum, says, “Maize and Snitz is a great way to see not only the Hans Herr House and the Longhouse but to see a lot of traditional crafts and machines in action that are not part of our day-to-day operations at the museum. People of all ages have a great time at this event.”

A variety of food will be available during the festival, including the iconic Herr House smoked sausage sandwiches. There will also be assorted desserts, including apple dumplings.

Admission is $12 for adults, $6 for children 7-12, and free for those 6 and under.

Maize and Snitz Festival is part of over forty Lancaster Roots 2018 events. Lancaster Roots combines the events of the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society and the 1719 Herr House & Museum. Through public presentations, food, music, field trips, and classes, these events reveal Lancaster and its people: their stories, culture, and history.

1719 Herr House & Museum
1849 Hans Herr Dr., Willow Street Pa. 17584
(717) 464-4438 • www.hansherr.org

Lancaster Roots 2018
www.LancasterRoots.org

Learn Hearth Cooking at the Hans Herr House

Learn to cook on the hearth at the 1719 Herr House

• Hearth cooking class is offered from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday, September 22.

Lancaster Roots 2018: "Made possible with support from: Garden Spot Village, www.gardenspotvillage.org; Herr Foods, Inc., www.herrs.com; Landis Homes www.Landishomes.org"Lancaster, Pa., August 11, 2018—From the earliest days after the house’s construction in 1719, residents of the Herr House prepared food on a German-style raised hearth. This fall, experience cooking in the oldest kitchen in Lancaster County during a hearth cooking class from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, September 22, at the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum. During the class, the group will prepare and eat a meal including soup, bread, and a dessert.

Before cooking stoves were invented, people cooked on an open-hearth fireplace located in the kitchen. On a raised section of the fireplace, or hearth, a smaller fire was built to cook with. For larger pots, a crane was attached to the chimney to hold them over the fire.

The class costs $35. Claim your spot by calling (717) 464-4438 or registering online at hansherr.org. The deadline for registration is Tuesday, September 7.

Patricia Motter, a long-time guide at the Herr House will lead the class. She often demonstrates the use of the hearth for special events at the Herr House.

This folk art class is part of over forty Lancaster Roots 2018 events. Lancaster Roots combines the events of the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society and the 1719 Herr House & Museum. Through public presentations, food, music, field trips, and classes, these events reveal Lancaster and its people: their stories, culture, and history.

1719 Herr House & Museum
1849 Hans Herr Dr., Willow Street Pa. 17584
(717) 464-4438 • www.hansherr.org

Lancaster Roots 2018
www.LancasterRoots.org

Music in the Orchard at Hans Herr House

Music in the Orchard features local artists

  • Music fills the orchard at the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum this summer featuring some of Central
    Pennsylvania’s best local performers.
  • Music in the Orchard concerts will be held on June 9 and 23, July 7 and 21, and August 4, each starting at
    6 p.m.

Lancaster, Pa., April 26, 2018—Music in the Orchard returns to the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum for another summer highlighting local artists. Concerts are every other week, June 9 through August 4, at the bucolic Herr House orchard. Bring a picnic dinner and listen to talented musicians perform. Tickets are available on site and cost $8 per person, children under 12 are free; no advance registration is required. The 1719 Hans Herr House and Museum is an alcohol- and smoke-free environment.

Joy Ike will open the series on Saturday, June 9. With poetic lyrics, soaring vocals, and percussive pianoplaying, Ike performs a unique blend of neo-soul with a hint of pop. “I believe good music is simply poetry with a soundtrack,” she says. Alex Brubaker, Lancaster based fingerstyle guitarist, will open. Combining melodic playing with the rhythmic drive from two hand tapping and percussive hits on the body and strings of the guitar, he couples technique with elements such as live looping to create complex soundscapes.

The second concert in the series, June 23, sees the return of Vinegar Creek Constituency to the orchard stage. Since 2005, they have been delighting audiences with their distinctive style that encompasses bluegrass, ragtime, swing, outlaw country, and more. Singer-songwriter and guitarist Leonardo DiSanto says, “I really
hear our music as a form of primitive rock-n-roll played with a bluegrass instrumentation.”

July 7 will see Rizzetta’s Tones make their Music in the Orchard debut. Rizzetta’s Tones is a Celtic and folk band, comprised of ‘fraternal twin’ hammer dulcimers, silver flute, high and low whistles, and guitars. Their repertoire includes music from Ireland, Scotland, and the United States, drawing as well from the traditions of Finland, Brazil, France, Macedonia, and many other lands.

Smokehouse 4 will perform the penultimate concert on July 21, serving up their unique mix of “roots rock, blues, and funk with a shot of N’awlins soul.” Drawing on the rich history of traditional New Orleans blues and neo-New Orleans southern-fried funk, Smokehouse 4 delivers powerhouse jams and gritty, tight grooves that are sure to please. The noted Native American musician Terry Strongheart will open.

The season will close on August 4 with Cricket Tell the Weather, an indie string band with a bluegrass-inspired sound. Cricket delivers honest vocals and thoughtful arrangements with a modern edge.

Concerts are held rain or shine. In inclement weather, the concert will move into the implement shed on the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum grounds. In cases of severe weather, cancellations will be announced by 3 p.m. on the day of the concert.

This tour is part of over forty Lancaster Roots 2018 events. Lancaster Roots combines the events of the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society and the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum. Through public presentations, food, music, field trips, and classes, these events reveal Lancaster and its people: their stories, culture, and history.

PA German Classes this fall through the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society

Learn Pennsylvania German this fall

  • Learn Pennsylvania German, the language now most associated with the Plain communities, but once spoken widely by descendants of German Lutheran and Reformed immigrants as well.
  • Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society offers beginning and intermediate courses in Pennsylvania German, March through May.

Lancaster, Pa., July 19, 2018— Preservation of the distinctive language tradition of early German immigrants to Lancaster County continues at the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society. Butch Reigart will serve as the instructor for two ten-week courses on different levels this fall.

A beginner class will meet on Wednesdays, September 12 to November 14, 7 to 9 p.m. An intermediate course is also offered Thursdays, September 13 to November 15, 7 to 9 p.m. Both classes take place at 2215 Millstream Road, Lancaster, on Route 30 (Lincoln Highway East), beside Tanger Outlet Center. Those familiar with German have an advantage and can usually start at the intermediate level.

Pennsylvania German originated in the southeastern region of the state, coming from the German-speaking Swiss, German, and Alsatian immigrants who arrived between 1683 and 1808.
Today the language is often associated with Old Order Amish and Mennonite communities in Pennsylvania, although historically descendants of Lutheran, Reformed, and other immigrant groups coming from southwestern Germany spoke it widely. Reigart notes, “the Amish percentage of current dialect speakers is ever increasing as the Amish continue to hold onto and teach it to their children as part of their efforts to maintain separation from the modern world.”

Reigart, who lives in Columbia, Pennsylvania, grew up hearing Pennsylvania German in his childhood home in York County. He later became fluent, received degrees in German and Russian, and served as a foreign-language specialist for the United States government for more than thirty-five years.

Registration can occur online at www.lmhs.org or by calling (717) 393-9745. Primary instructional materials are included in the course fee of $100 for Historical Society members and $115 for nonmembers. Supplemental texts, dictionaries, recordings, and other study aids are available from the Society bookstore.

These classes are part of over forty Lancaster Roots 2018 events. Lancaster Roots combines the activities of the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society and the 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum. Through public presentations, food, music, field trips, and classes, these events reveal Lancaster and its people: their stories, culture, and history.

Blacksmiths Converge at 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum

More big news from a Family Museum Pass Partner!

  • The 1719 Hans Herr House & Museum hosts blacksmith demonstrations from 12 to 4 p.m. on Friday,
    June 15, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 16.
  • Go back in time during Blacksmith Days to watch, learn, an even try a hand working with fire and
    steel.

Willow Street, Pa., June 5, 2018—“The idea of using the most basic equipment and being able to make something was almost magical,” says David Kauffman. “A person can take a fire, a hammer, an anvil or even a big rock, a piece of steel, throw in some basic blacksmithing steps and make a real, tangible item that started as an idea in their head.” See this process in action during Blacksmith Days at the 1719 Herr House & Museum, from 12 to 4 p.m. on Friday, June 15, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 16. Kauffman, coordinator for Blacksmith Days, expects to have fifty or more smiths working on portable
forges and anvils. They will be working on a variety of projects, letting visitors see how several different types of items are made.

There is a possibility for visitors to try their hands during Blacksmith Days, on a case by case basis. Admission to the grounds for Blacksmith Days is free; regular admission applies for tours of the Herr House and Native American Longhouse.

Blacksmith Days is part of over forty Lancaster Roots 2018 events. Lancaster Roots combines the events of the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society and the 1719 Herr House & Museum. Through public presentations, food, music, field trips, and classes, these events reveal Lancaster and its people: their stories, culture, and history.

Amending America Coming to LancasterHistory.org

Amending America: The Bill of Rights. A Logo featuring three faces in profile.From our Family Museum Pass Partner LancasterHistory.org:

An exciting exhibition is coming to LancasterHistory.org from June 16 – August 11, 2018. We’re bringing the nationally-recognized travelling exhibition by the National Archives, Amending America: The Bill of Rights, to LancasterHistory.org for a limited time summer run. Amending America: The Bill of Rights spotlights one of the most remarkable periods in American history, explores the origins of the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution (collectively known as the Bill of Rights), and illustrates how each amendment protects U.S. citizens. It contains document reproductions, videos, and interactives that let visitors guess at how many times an amendment has been proposed or “vote on” potential amendments.

Library Family Museum Pass holders will be able to utilize their pass to also view Amending America (the pass will still be able to be used for General Admission, which includes a tour of Wheatland).

Find out more about this traveling exhibition on the LancasterHistory.org website.